'Watch out for him!' Kipchoge names the man to break 2-hour marathon barrier

Kelvin Kiptum

Kenya's Kelvin Kiptum runs to the line to win the men's race at the finish of the 2023 London Marathon in central London on April 23, 2023. 
 

Photo credit: Justin Tallis | AFP

What you need to know:

  • KIpchoge, the two-time Olympic marathon champion, has tipped the new London Marathon champion Kelvin Kiptum as one of the upcoming runners to break the world record
  • Describing Kiptum’s victory in the London Marathon last month as phenomenal and a great performance, Kipchoge hopes that the fast-rising distance runner will break the world record
  • Kiptum, who missed the world record by 18 seconds and is now the second fastest man in marathon history, beat Eliud Kipochoge’s course record of 2:02:37 set in 2019

Two-time Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge has predicted the world marathon record will go down soon.

KIpchoge has tipped the new London Marathon champion Kelvin Kiptum as one of the upcoming runners to break the world marathon record.

Describing Kiptum’s victory in the London Marathon last month as phenomenal, Kipchoge hopes that the fast-rising distance runner will break the record.

Kipchoge was speaking Thursday after a colourful ceremony where Isuzu East Africa officially launched the limited edition Isuzu D-Max model dubbed “Eliud Kipchoge 1:59 Limited Special D-Max Edition” double cabin pickup in his honour.

At hand to unveil the vehicle were Isuzu East Africa Managing Director Rita Kavashe and General marketing manager Kevin Ochieng.

“I always say records are meant to be broken and I hope Kiptum does that in the near future. He is a man with a big heart,” said Kipchoge.

“The two-hour barrier is there for someone to run under and I have always shown people the way and it can be done,” explained Kipchoge, adding that Kiptum is fast building a concrete fortress.

Kipchoge has broken the marathon world record twice in 2018 and 2022 in Berlin, besides running under two hours in Vienna, Austria.

Kipchoge won the 2018 Berlin Marathon in two hours, one minute and 39 seconds before breaking it last year in 2:01:09 the same course for his fourth victory in the city.

“I am sure if not Kiptum and myself, other athletes will run under two hours,” added Kipchoge.

Kiptum rewrote history books when he smashed the London Marathon course record, winning this year’s race in 2:01:25 on April 23.

Kiptum, who missed the world record by 18 seconds and is now the second fastest man in marathon history, beat Eliud Kipchoge’s course record of 2:02:37 set in 2019.

Kiptum had on December 4, last year ran the third fastest time in marathon history when winning in Valencia in 2:01:53. It was his debut over the distance.

Kipchoge described the launch as a great day and history in the country for a special edition to be released in honour of a sportsman.

“I hope this continues to inspire the next generation to work harder. They should know that there is always a reward for good deeds,” explained Kipchoge, who praised Isuzu East Africa for being his third leg in their partnership that has lasted for six years.

Talking about his experience from the Boston Marathon where he finished sixth in 2:09:23, Kipchoge, who had set his target of running course records in all the six World Marathon Majors (WMM), thanked his fans across the world for believing in him.

Evans Chebet won the Boston Marathon in 2:05:54.

Kipchoge said that he always comes back stronger, singling out when he finished eighth during the 2020 London Marathon only to defend his Olympic Marathon title in 2021 in Tokyo.

“Being behind one day is not the end of the world…you can wake up well today and tomorrow you are down. It happens in sports, nothing is permanent, I am human too,” said Kipchoge, adding that he is still happy that he continues to inspire multitudes around the world despite the shortcomings.

“It’s not always about winning but inspiring people,” said Kipchoge explaining that the Boston Marathon taught him the need to continue working hard and being consistent.

“Life is actually not always smooth and no one should reach a comfort zone. When one hits a bump by mistake, just stand up, dust yourself and hit the road again,” said Kipchoge as he kept his options open on his next race after Boston.

"My focus is on training now and my family but keep an eye on my social media platforms," said Kipchoge.

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