For peace, get political integrity

Smoke billows in Kenol town, Murang'a County on October 4, 2020 as Jubilee Party youths clashed.

Photo credit: Mwangi Muiruri | Nation Media Group

What you need to know:

  • The Tangatanga and Kieleweke factions of the ruling Jubilee Party washed their dirty linens in public.
  • Needless to say, officials are guided by the Public Officers Ethics Act 2005.

With the 2022 General Election fast approaching, the political arena is littered with a premature supremacy battle for presidential succession.

While there is nothing wrong with politicians selling themselves to the voters, many of them, especially those with declared presidential ambition, have become anathema to Kenyans due to their political bigotry and public altercations.

The media is awash with cases of illegitimate political behaviour — like what happened at the burial of five members of one family in Murang’ a County. The Tangatanga and Kieleweke factions of the ruling Jubilee Party washed their dirty linens in public.

Health protocols during the Covid-19 pandemic have been disregarded. Political rallies have become platforms for perpetuating impunity, diatribe and unprintable insults.

Worse, the tug-of-war between DP William Ruto and his long-running political rival, ODM leader Raila Odinga, has metamorphised from political differences to personal antagonism.

Corrupt leaders

Leadership and integrity is enshrined in Chapter Six of the Constitution yet our political leadership lacks maturity and responsibility. Indubitably, the twin problems of corrupt leaders and misappropriation of public funds bedevil the country.

The dearth of integrity in leadership has plunged many state agencies into poor performance, financial mess and disrepute. Needless to say, officials are guided by the Public Officers Ethics Act 2005.

Honesty and integrity are vital prerequisites in leadership. A leader should not be driven by personal aggrandizement or self-gratification in pursuit of short-term personal gain but internalise that diversion of public funds for personal use is immoral.

 “Despite the corporate realities of greed, competition and the drive to achieve goals and profits, leaders can act from moral values and encourage others to develop and use moral values in the workplace,” says Richard L. Daft. There is no political integrity without personal integrity.

 josephmuthama05@gmail.com.