Kenyans beaten to writing their own story on Daadab

A Somali refugee shops for fresh produce at a market within the Hagadera camp in the sprawling Dadaab refugee camp, north of the Kenyan capital Nairobi, on April 29, 2015. If we want to change this single story, more Kenyans have to write about Kenya. Of course, it’s a democratic world so we can’t bar any person from writing on Kenya. PHOTO | AFP

What you need to know:

  • With the book, Rawlence, a westerner, puts Kenyan journalists and other writers to shame. He has written a book on Dadaab, and no Kenyan has! Then we complain that “Westerners twist our stories”.
  • The Garissa massacre was one of the worst terrorist incidents in Kenya; what have Kenyans written about it? Shouldn’t we chronicle our tears? Should we wait for other people from the West to do it for us?
  • If we want to change this single story, more Kenyans have to write about Kenya. Of course, it’s a democratic world so we can’t bar any person from writing on Kenya.

It’s a long way from Dadaab, the dusty and chaotic northern-Kenyan town, to the manicured lawns of the White House in Washington DC, America’s seat of power.

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