Ending SGBV requires open talks about stereotypes, norms

Religious leaders and activists in Lamu march to protest against increased child defilement and gender-based violence cases in the region.

Photo credit: Kalume Kazungu| Nation Media Group

What you need to know:

  • Sexual violence is an entire society’s problem because it affects us all.
  • During Covid-19, violence in the home has become what the global community call, the ‘shadow pandemic’.
  • In Kenya, statistics record 45 per cent of women and girls aged 15-49 have experienced SGBV.
  • Victim-blaming, trivialising of rape and the stigma faced by survivors are still far too common.
  • The socialisation of boys at an early age can have a long-term impact in shifting gender norms.

Sexual violence is not a women’s problem, nor a girl’s problem. It is an entire society’s problem because it affects us all. Breaking down harmful stereotypes and bringing men and boys into the conversation are two of the most important norm changes we collectively need to nurture.

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