Effects of Covid-19: The blows on sex lives in marriages

Cases of domestic violence have been on a sharp rise since the pandemic and when measures to control it began.

Cases of domestic violence have been on a sharp rise since the pandemic and when measures to control it began.

Note 1

Married couples who had regular satisfying sex dropped from 45.1 per cent to 35.3 per cent after Covid-19.

Note 2

26.6 per cent of married couples were dissatisfied with their sex lives before Covid-19 compared to 41.6 percent of married couples who were dissatisfied with their sex lives after Covid-19.

Note 3

Only 4.1 per cent of married couples wanted sex less often before Covid-19 compared to 21.1 per cent of married couples who wanted sex less often after Covid-19 started.

Note 4

73.4 per cent of married Kenyans in the research said that they were satisfied with their marital sex before Covid-19.

What you need to know:

  • According to the ‘Shadow Pandemic: Violence against women during Covid-19’, research by the UN Women, over 243 million people have been experiencing domestic violence globally at the hands of intimate partners.
  • Monetary and health issues are taking a psychological toll on many people leading to low levels of general and sexual satisfaction.

When the Covid-19 pandemic arrived in Kenya in March 2020 and people started working from home, couples who had lost their intimate touch got a golden opportunity to reconnect. Suddenly, there was adequate time to spend around each other, to communicate, and to get intimate. However, as the pandemic wore on, it bred familiarity among couples. The excitement of intimacy it had brought with it fizzled. Compounded by a tanking economy and rising job losses, sexual desire took a nosedive.

Welcome!

You're all set to enjoy unlimited Prime content.