MUTHIANI: Global crisis will birth new job opportunities

Above all, to be a successful job seeker, you need to show an employer that you’re enthusiastic, hard working and self motivated. PHOTO | FILE | NATION MEDIA GROUP

What you need to know:

  • There is increased demand for roles that leverage distinct human skills like content creation, user experience designers, e-commerce and social media specialists, critical thinkers, and innovators.
  • Others include professional training and knowledge development professionals, wellness and health management therapists, culture and diversity specialists, project management, cybersecurity, ethical hackers, and physiotherapists.

Jobs and professions have changed over the years as new ways of doing business require new skills and competencies. What worked best during the first industrial revolution where water and steam-powered production evolved as the world moved to electric power for mass production.

Similarly, we have witnessed electronics and Information Technology become key features in automating production, phasing out jobs and creating new ones.

The ongoing big process of augmenting jobs through technology has rendered some jobs irrelevant as chatbots, robotics and now increasing work around artificial intelligence become key features is our lives.

The fact is that when our young ones in primary school join the labour market in a decade or so from now, a good number of the jobs as we know them today will have evolved or become irrelevant. But we will also see many new jobs emerge driven by different factors.

Innovations around technology will continue to create new careers for information security experts, data analysts, software application developers, robotic engineers, blockchain specialists, process automation experts, marine engineers to name a few. But not all jobs will be Stem-focused meaning in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

There is increased demand for roles that leverage distinct human skills like content creation, user experience designers, e-commerce and social media specialists, critical thinkers, and innovators. Others include professional training and knowledge development professionals, wellness and health management therapists, culture and diversity specialists, project management, cybersecurity, ethical hackers, and physiotherapists.

In the coming years, work will not just be limited to an office but we will see most organisations embrace the emerging practice of flexible work arrangements across the globe. Not all international jobs will demand relocation. Competencies in taxation, compliance, complex problem solving, interdisciplinary knowledge, process improvements and the ability to deal with complexity will be sought after.

Global challenges in climate change will create opportunities for environmental specialists, scientists, engineers, and technicians. With high urbanisation and land scarcity, there is an impending need to transform food security systems and careers on foods including alternative sources besides meat and poultry are areas that should interest many. The world will need researchers, campaigners, communication strategists, and solution providers.

A story on unattractive courses for candidates caught my eye last week and I was dismayed to see students avoiding courses in renewable energy, marine, and aquatic resources, animal production, and nutrition which will be in demand.

Opportunities for business will continue to emerge driven by the sharing economy as we have witnessed in delivery riders, Airbnb, Uber Taxi, Uber Eats, creating business and self-employment opportunities to many. Other emerging businesses like Cloud Kitchens of fully fitted kitchens for take-outs will create good business opportunities for those keen on turnkey solutions.

As it is our nature to grow in wisdom and stature as we journey through life, all that is around us evolves with time and so do jobs and professions.

Ms Muthiani, a HR specialist with over 20 years’ experience, is the MD, MillennialHR