Clubs eager to get on with fresh season

Boniface Andayi

Boniface Andayi (right) of Ulinzi Stars vies for the ball with AFC Leopards' Kingley Fasanmi during their friendly match at Nyayo National sStadium on September 4, 2022.

Photo credit: Sila Kiplagat | Nation Media Group

What you need to know:

  • So far, the Transition Committee has not guided the clubs on the way forward and this has affected the pre-season preparations.

With less than a week left to the new date set for the start of the season, we hope the Football Kenya Federation (FKF) Transition Committee will stick to the September 24 kick-off.

According to league organisers led by Maurice Oyugi, who took over from retired Judge Aaron Ringera, the new campaign was initially set to commence on September 10, but was pushed forward for a further two weeks yet clubs continue incurring expenses beyond their budgets.

So far, the Transition Committee has not guided the clubs on the way forward and this has affected the pre-season preparations.

Teams are currently engaged in pre-season preparations every week and they don’t expect any changes without the committee giving them a reason for doing so.

When asked to comment on the changes, AFC Leopards’ coach Patrick Aussems said that, professionally, that is a complete lack of respect.

Complicated situation

This situation is a little more complicated than people think as there could be a fixtures congestion at the end of the season that will result in the delay of the 2023/24 campaign.

That said though, football clubs are still obliged to pay their players in full.

Some teams had taken loans and hoped to service them from gate collections. They had also reached agreements with their broadcast partners, but are now unable to pay them promptly.

Other teams including AFC Leopards had taken payment upfront from their shirt sponsors in exchange to ensure the sponsors products are displayed for a certain period.

Teams had arrived at short-term agreements with their players, but will now be forced to engage their employers in their individual capacities.

Some players have even agreed to return a portion of their salaries to the clubs in order to help the management to face the crisis and the operational costs involved, while others have agreed to a salary cut until the league starts.

Staff at some clubs appear to have taken leave in order to cushion the financial impact upon their employers.  Lower leagues are suffering the most.

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