Kenyan World Cup scribes can now breath - Doha Notebook 29

Charles Nyende and Isaac Swila

Charles Nyende (left) of Nation Media Group in a selfie with Royal Media Group's Isaac Swila inside a metro train in Doha, Qatar.

Photo credit: Charles Nyende | Nation Media Group

What you need to know:

  • After covering matches every day for 29 days the weary East Africa journos can now take a deserved break, well earned
  • Fifa president Gianni Infantino revealed last week that over 3.7 million people applied for the Hayya card out of which 1.3 were issued with the precious digital document
  • Many thousands have also been working in the service and logistic sectors, and other fields for the one month that the tournament has been running

Kenyan World Cup scribes can now breath

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It has been an honour and privilege for the eight officially accredited Kenyan journalists who have been covering the Qatar World Cup, reporting on all the 64 matches across the eight venues, the fan zones and the public places where Qataris and international visitors have mingled in the name of the beautiful game. The journalists are yours truly of Nation Media Group, Isaac Swila (Royal Media Group), Daniel Wahome, Elynah Shiveka and Khamis Mambo (KBC), Moses Wakhisi (KTN), Eric Njiru (Radio Africa) and Collins Okinyo (soka25east.com). After covering matches every day for 29 days the weary East Africa journos can now take a deserved break, well earned.

Big figures for biggest football show

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Fifa president Gianni Infantino revealed last week that over 3.7 million people applied for the Hayya card out of which 1.3 were issued with the precious digital document that allowed a visitor to enter Qatar. The Hayya card acted as a visa and was also a mandatory requirement to obtain match tickets and attend games at the stadium. Some 180,000 persons were accredited for the tournament. These included football officials, journalists, volunteers, service providers, security personnel and just about everybody who was involved in the tournament. It was a huge undertaking by Fifa underscoring the fact that the quadrennial football Cup is the biggest sporting spectacle in the world.

Workers fear loss of jobs after tourney

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That the World Cup in Qatar has provided thousands of jobs for many people from different nations is not in doubt. For starters, Fifa recruited 20,000 volunteers to assist in the operations of the World Cup in Qatar. Many thousands have also been working in the service and logistic sectors, and other fields for the one month that the tournament has been running. Many workers are now fearing they will lose their jobs, for instance, bus drivers who have been transporting the football fans to and from the stadium. Many drivers from Kenya were employed in this vital sector and they will be hoping they will be retained after the World Cup that ended last Sunday.

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