Former Harambee Stars coaches train grassroot coaches in Mombasa

Adel Amrouche

Former Harambee Stars coaches (from left) Adel Amrouche, Mohamed Kheri and Jacob 'ghost' Mulee together with former KFF Vice President Twaha Mbarak during a coaching refresher course in Mombasa on December 24, 2021.

Photo credit: Kevin Odit | Nation Media Group

What you need to know:

  • The coaches said the state of football in the country has stagnated because there are no proper youth programs for identifying and nurturing talents.
  • Led by former Harambee coaches Adel Amrouche, Jacob "Ghost" Mulee and Mohamed Kheri, the coaches shared their views on how the country can move forward.

Former Harambee Stars coaches and players on Friday met with football coaches in Mombasa in a consultative meeting.

The coaches said the state of football in the country has stagnated because there are no proper youth programs for identifying and nurturing talents.

Led by former Harambee coaches Adel Amrouche, Jacob "Ghost" Mulee and Mohamed Kheri, the coaches shared their views on how the country can move forward.

“We are here to share our experiences on different football matters with upcoming coaches in Mombasa. I am so happy that we are able to do this. Coaches can work together anywhere because we work for one cause,” Mulee said.

Mulee, who three months ago left his position as the head coach national team, said he was happy to have played his part in trying to improve football in the country.

“I am very happy that my friend Amrouche is here. I worked with him as a technical director when we won Cecafa in 2013 . It is a privilege to share football ideas with fellow coaches,” he said.

Amrouche said he is ready to share his experience with Kenyan coaches for the sake of improving football in the country.

“We are here to find how we can build a philosophy for Kenyan players. Kenya has quality players and should build its own philosophy,” he said.

The Algerian-born Belgian believes that Kenya can compete at the highest level because it has talented players.

“I had a good time with the national  team. What is important is that we are here to share our experience,” he said.

“The only problem is that people do not remember the coaches but only the players,” added the coach.

Amrouche also said he was optimistic that Kenyan will resolve the ongoing stalemate between the government and the Football Kenya Federation that led to the appointment of caretaker committee that is currently managing the sport in the country.

“My hope is to see Kenya on the top, you are not far. I hope you find a solution to the problem that you have here in Kenya and bring the right people in the right place. When you make mistakes you pay, that is football,” he said.

Amrouche also wants to see former footballers given a chance to lead the federation.

“I hope to see a footballer taking charge of football in Kenya. We have many former players now and they must be given a chance. But knowledge is key because in football no one knows everything, we must share ideas,” he added.

Kheri said the country still has the opportunity to improve football. He said the neighboring country Uganda had developed its football because of the good youth programs that the country has invested in.

“Uganda is a head of Kenya in football because of the youth programs. That is why their national team is better than ours,” said Kheri.

The training was organised by Mombasa County Football Association, Kenya Football Coaches Association (Kefoca) and FKF presidential aspirant Twaha Mbarak.

Former Kenya Under-17 and Under-20 coach Rajab Babu, who also attended the meeting, thanked the former coaches for sharing ideas with the upcoming coaches.

Babu, who is also the current national beach football coach, said the coaches need to acquire proper knowledge for football to grow.

“If we miss it at grassroot level then we have no business being in football,” said the Brazilian trained tactician.

Former Harrambee Stars players James Situma and Douglas Mutua attended the meeting.

“We need to see players coming from the grassroots levels. We also want to see former players taking up leadership roles because they have played football so they know it well,” said Situma, who is the chairman of the Kenya Footballers Welfare Association.

The over 65 grassroots coaches have been on a five-day coaching refresher course.

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