A band aid approach to peace will not save South Sudan

Riek Machar (front, right) is sworn is as First Vice President of South Sudan on February 22, 2020, in Juba, rejoining the government in the latest bid to bring peace to a nation ravaged by war. Machar has been sworn in following years of civil war between his SPLA-IO and President Salva Kiir’s SPLA, leaving 400,000 South Sudanese dead. PHOTO | ALEX MCBRIDE / AFP

What you need to know:

  • South Sudanese are cautiously celebrating the long-awaited peace deal between the government of Salva Kiir Mayardit and former Vice President, Riek Machar Teny.
  • But more important, people want this new government to start championing a project of return to peace, reviving the economy, providing hope to the millions in refugees and internally displaced persons that there will be security and that they will be assisted to return home.
  • This government will be a mere postponement of conflict if it gives a blind eye to the corruption and grand theft that has created a ghastly and deadly form of inequality in South Sudan since 2005.
  • And the moment to start thinking very seriously about how to transform this country is now. It is such moments as this, with no victor and no vanquished, where peaceful means, development, building of state institutions, that everyone stands a chance to win, giving everyone hope that justice for all is attainable.

South Sudanese are cautiously celebrating the long-awaited formation of the Revitalised Transitional Government of National Unity (R-TGoNU), expected to finally bring a peace agreement signed in late 2018 between the government of Salva Kiir Mayardit and former Vice President, Riek Machar Teny to its final implementation stages.

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