Light Academy emerges Nairobi’s top private school

The 2016 Light Academy Karen Campus candidates check their KCSE results at the school on December 30, 2016. The school was among the schools that emerged the best in the county and the best private schools in Nairobi. PHOTO | ANTHONY OMUYA | NATION MDEIA GROUP

What you need to know:

  • The academy posted 22 A–, 14 B+, four B (plain), nine B–, six C+ and one C minus.
  • Mr Ismail Kucuk, the head teacher, said that even though they were happily sitting among the top schools in the country, they recorded a drop in this year’s exam compared to the previous two years.
  • The school has for more than four years in a row maintained a mean score of 9.5 and above, a consistency the head teacher attributed to discipline and hard work among students.

Light Academy is the top private school in Nairobi in the 2016 Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) exams.

The academy, which enrolled 56 candidates, posted 22 A– (minus), 14 B+, four B (plain), nine B– (minus), 6 C+ and one C– (minus), placing it among secondary schools to have excellent performance in the national examinations.

However, despite the outstanding performance, there was not much celebration going on at the school when the Nation team visited the institution of Friday afternoon.

Mr Ismail Kucuk, the head teacher, said that even though they were happily sitting among the top schools in the country, they recorded a drop in this year’s exam compared to the previous two years.

Most of the students did not perform well in English as compared to other subjects such as mathematics and chemistry therefore dragging the mean score down, Mr Kucuk said.

The school attained a mean score of 9.6, a drop from last year’s 10.90.

GENUINE RESULTS

He however said they were the results are genuine and a reflection of the students personal efforts.

The school has for more than four years in a row maintained a mean score of 9.5 and above, a consistency the head teacher attributed to discipline and hard work among students.

“For us discipline among students is key. We also engage our students in a lot of co-curriculum activities to keep them busy. A busy student has no time to run around,” Mr Kucuk said.

Ibrahim Muhamud, one of the students who scored A– (minus), said that they freely interacted with their teachers and as a result they always felt motivated.

He added that they were managed to pull through due to proper preparations and support of their teachers.

“Our teachers are very flexible and supportive, at times they could organise practical lessons for us even at night whenever we called them upon,” explained Muhamud, adding that the results they had achieved are well deserved.

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