Corruption the most pressing problem facing country, survey shows

What you need to know:

  • 18 per cent of the population considers corruption the worst problem the country faces.

  • Mukurwe-ini MP Kabando wa Kabando said the Judiciary was to blame for corruption.

  • The President is the public figure most Kenyans can identify from a photograph.

On the eve of the President’s address to Parliament, corruption is viewed as the greatest problem facing Kenya ahead of tribalism, high cost of living, joblessness and inequality, a survey has shown. 

The poll — Sauti za Wananchi — by Twaweza East Africa, shows that 18 per cent of the population considers corruption the worst problem the country faces compared to a sixth of Kenyans who think the main concern is the cost of living while nine per cent finger unemployment.

ODM boss John Mbadi endorsed the poll, saying it captured the national pulse.

“It is a reflection of the country’ feelings. Corruption has reached unprecedented levels,” Mr Mbadi said.

“Kenyans feel helpless against corruption in the government. The President raised hopes during his last address to Parliament. The Treasury has also never been able to answer questions surrounding Eurobond. Jubilee promised to grow the economy by double digits and give the country one million jobs a year. It has failed to do so.” 

Mukurwe-ini MP Kabando wa Kabando said the Judiciary was to blame for corruption.

“It is true Kenyans are tired of corruption. The Judiciary continues distorting justice in favour of merchants of impunity. We should amend the Constitution to deny those accused of corruption bail,” Mr Kabando said.

“Once we tackle the problem, we will end unemployment. The Judiciary should assist the Executive in tackling this vice.”

The President is the public figure most Kenyans can identify from a photograph. Ninety-one per cent of respondents could say his name and role.

Cord leader Raila Odinga is the second most recognisable public figure with 82 per cent knowing who he is but only 71 per cent being able to state his role.

 Seventy-eight per cent of Kenyans were able to pick out US President Barrack Obama from a line-up while the percentage for Deputy President William Ruto was 77.  

According to the poll, which was conducted between November 12 and December 24 in all counties, the President is the best performing public servant (35 per cent) ahead of his deputy (30 per cent) and the attorney-general (23 per cent).

The poll revealed that 79 per cent of Kenyans think the government has done poorly in tackling inequality.

Almost three quarters or 73 per cent of those polled faulted the government’s tackling of corruption with only five per cent finding the attempts satisfactory.

Just 14 per cent of respondents think MPs are doing a good job compared to 17 per cent who rate MCAs highly.

“This is not true. When there are functions in constituencies, residents are more interested in listening to speeches by MPs and not MCAs,” Mr Kabando said.

“MPs are still held in high esteem. We are also not competing MCAs.”

At 74 per cent, the media are rated more favourably than religious leaders who are trusted by 62 per cent of Kenyans. EACC has trust of just 16 per cent of Kenyans.

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