Here’s why students are burning schools

What you need to know:

  • The new investigations commissioned by the Education Ministry reports that at least 30 secondary schools have been hit by unrest since the beginning of the year.
  • In the last week alone, at least five schools have gone on strike and in one case, Chalbi Secondary School in Marsabit, the students beat up and injured six teachers.
  • The principals and teachers in the affected schools reported that they were being put under pressure to abet cheating, failure to which the students take to strike.

A special investigation report has linked the wave of strikes in secondary schools to the tough measures aimed at curbing cheating in national examinations to be administered in three months
Students are apprehensive that they are unlikely to get their way during the exams and, therefore, are resorting to strikes to blackmail school authorities to bow to their demands. Until two years ago, it was common for students to collude and cheat in exams, sometimes with connivance of their teachers and even parents and guardians. However, this has since been made more difficult by the strict rules introduced under the stewardship of Dr Fred Matiang’i when he was the Cabinet Secretary for Education.
The new investigations commissioned by the Education Ministry reports that at least 30 secondary schools have been hit by unrest since the beginning of the year. In the last week alone, at least five schools have gone on strike and in one case, Chalbi Secondary School in Marsabit, the students beat up and injured six teachers.

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