Electronic waste a threat to health and the environment

Workers sort e-waste at the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Centre (WEEE). WEEE is one of the few registered companies dealing with e-waste recycling. PHOTO | FILE | NATION MEDIA GROUP

What you need to know:

  • Kenya, like other developing countries, lacks the capacity to dispose of the discarded items, which contain substances that have been known to cause diseases and poison water sources and the soil.
  • Yet in Kenya, the e-waste draft Bill of 2013 has been stuck in Parliament for more than five years, which makes one wonder why the government isn’t interested in legislating policies to tackle the fast ticking e-waste time bomb.
  • The International Renewable Energy Agency (Irena) estimates that there will be a surge in solar panel disposal in the early 2030s, and that by 2050, there will be 60 to 78 million cumulative tonnes of photovoltaic panel waste globally.
  • Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) is one of the few registered companies dealing with e-waste recycling.

Joseph Mulama rummages through a pile of used printer cartridges stored in a corner of his Smart Tech Cybercafé, on Tom Mboya Street in Nairobi, wondering how to get rid of them.

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