Nyama choma and kachumbari

Ribs,choma. Photo/FILE

What you need to know:

  • Today I will talk about street food.
  • Though affordable and convenient, I feel that there should be regulation to prevent food poisoning due to poor sanitation and hygiene.
  • If you are one of those people who only get to enjoy nyama choma in a bar or restaurant, why not prepare it at home this time round?

Food is an integral part of our lives and an important part of our socialising.

Today I will talk about street food. As the name suggests, it refers to food sold in the open air, for instance the githeri, chapati, boiled maize, or mutura we buy by the roadside on our way home.

Selling street food has become a popular business as more and more people, especially the working class, look for ways to ease their lives. Other popular street fare includes fruit salad, boiled eggs, Farmer’s Choice smokies (they come with a helping of kachumbari), and nyama choma.

Boiled eggs and smokies with a generous helping of kachumbari are a favourite, at least where I come from, and make a quick affordable snack.

Though affordable and convenient, I feel that there should be regulation to prevent food poisoning due to poor sanitation and hygiene.

As a precaution, ensure that the vendor is clean and presentable, the area free of dirty water, the food placed on a clean surface, and the area free of dust.

If you are one of those people who only get to enjoy nyama choma in a bar or restaurant, why not prepare it at home this time round?

Nyama choma and kachumbari

All you need is a large sufuria and a fire.

Ingredients:

  • Meat on bone with a little fat, cut to desirable size
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Soy sauce (optional)
  • Oil

Method

Pour a little oil in the sufuria and heat it. When it starts to smoke, you are ready to start cooking.

Place the meat into the sufuria and cook on one side until it browns. You will know it is cooking when it begins to sizzle.

Do not add salt or stir the meat until it browns on the first side. Also ensure that the sufuria is big enough so that every piece of the meat is touching the bottom.

Keep the heat on high and turn the pieces to cook and brown on either side. By this time, your kitchen should be filled with a delicious meat flavour.

Cover the pot and allow to cook with the heat on medium.

Add salt and pepper, stir the meat and add a little water to loosen the flavour stuck on the sufuria.

The meat should be ready in about 10-15 minutes, depending on quantity and tenderness.

Serve with ugali and kachumbari.

For more recipes, guides and tips on how to improve your cooking, email me, [email protected] or visit my website www.chef-raphael.com

Chef’s tip
To get the most of meat flavour when cooking, cook on a hot pan, but do not add salt since salt draws out the water from meat, causing it to become tough.

The trick is to allow the meat to brown, then add salt when the meat is just about ready.

The browning makes the meat tastier and shortens cooking time.

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