Andropause: Dear men, there is male menopause

Signs of andropause include depression, memory loss and mood swings.

Signs of andropause include depression, memory loss and mood swings.

Photo credit: fotosearch

What you need to know:

  • Just as women experience menopause, men experience andropause.
  • The majority of men will start to experience the symptoms of andropause at the age of 50.
  • Men go through several changes as they age, from greying hair to decreased muscle mass.


Men. The strong ones, the tough ones, the ones who are supposed to manage anything that comes their way. But there is one thing that even the most macho of men cannot escape: andropause. Also known as "male menopause," andropause is a natural stage of life that most men will eventually go through.

Just as women experience menopause, men experience andropause. Their bodies start to change, and they no longer produce as much testosterone as they once did.

At the age of 50, majority of men will start to experience the symptoms of andropause.

Men go through several changes as they age, from greying hair to decreased muscle mass. However, one of the most significant changes that men experience is a decline in testosterone levels.

This decline can lead to various symptoms, including fatigue, low libido, and difficulty concentrating.

While andropause is a natural part of the aging process, it can be frustrating for many men.

Andropause overview

The testosterone hormone is responsible for a variety of functions in men. For example, it regulates sex drive, sperm production, and muscle mass. It also plays a role in maintaining bone density and red blood cell production.

It is produced in the testes and adrenal glands. As men age, their testosterone levels naturally decline. This leads to a condition called andropause.

The signs and symptoms of andropause can include:

  • A decrease in sex drive
  • Difficulty getting or maintaining an erection
  • Low sperm count
  • Reduced muscle mass
  • Increased body fat
  • Lack of sleep
  • Depression
  • Lack of motivation
  • Memory loss
  • Mood swings
  • Growth of breasts
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Fatigue due to low energy levels

Diagnosing and treatment options

Your doctor will likely do a blood test to measure your testosterone levels. If they are low, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may be prescribed.

You may be advised to change your lifestyle, such as get more exercise and eat a healthier diet. You may also be prescribed medication to help with other symptoms, such as fatigue or depression.

Could low testosterone levels be the cause of your joint pain?

Men of all ages can suffer from joint pain. It can make it challenging to move around and can be pretty debilitating. The causes of this type of pain are varied and complex, but one factor that is often overlooked is low testosterone levels.

While testosterone is typically associated with males' sexual health, it also plays a vital role in maintaining bone and muscle mass

Low testosterone levels can lead to a decrease in bone density, making bones more susceptible to breaks and fractures.

As a result, it is important to consider testosterone levels when trying to determine the cause of joint pain. While other factors may be at play, low testosterone could be the root of the problem.

Coping with the changes

  • Talk to your doctor about what you are experiencing. They will provide you with information and support.
  • Stay active. Exercise can boost your energy levels and improve your mood.
  • Eat a healthy diet. Eating nutritious foods will keep you healthy and energized.
  • Get enough sleep. A good night's sleep is essential for feeling rested and energised.
  • Destress. Taking some time for yourself can reduce stress and improve your mood.
  • Seek out support from friends or family members. Talking about what you are going through can help you feel more connected and less alone.

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