KMTC receives advanced devices for cervical cancer treatment

cancer war, kmtc, cancer machines

Cervical cancer affects the entrance to the womb. T

Photo credit: SHUTTERSTOCK

What you need to know:

  • KMTC will use the modern machines for on-site training to enhance trainees’ skills in treating precancerous cervical lesions by destroying abnormal cells that could develop into cancer. 
  • Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women globally, with an estimated 604 000 new cases and 342 000 deaths in 2020


The war on cervical cancer has received a major boost following the acquisition of ultramodern equipment for cervical cancer diagnosis and treatment.

The Ministry of Health has acquired 10 thermoablation and three cryotherapy in partnership with John Hopkins Program for International Education in Gynecology and Obstetrics .

The machines will be integrated in the Kenya Medical Training College (KMTC)’s curriculum, according to acting Director General at the Ministry of Health, Dr Patrick Amoth.

KMTC will use the modern machines for on-site training to enhance trainees’ skills in treating precancerous cervical lesions by destroying abnormal cells that could develop into cancer. 

The machines destroy abnormal cells that develop into cancer if not treated. Thermoablation machines deploy extreme heat while cryotherapy devices use extreme cold to freeze, hence destroying the cancerous cells.

Speaking during the handover and certification of the equipment in KMTC, Dr Amoth said the devices will reinforce the war against cervical cancer. He noted that students will be equipped with crucial skills in treating cervical cancer.

“If detected early, cervical cancer can be prevented and treated. Despite that, the disease remains the prevalent cancer in Kenya, claiming many lives of women. Lack of training and relevant skills for cancer among primary healthcare workers is a major setback in cervical and breast cancer control in the country,” said Dr Amoth.

According to KMTC boss, Dr Kelly Oluoch, early prognosis and effective treatment, which depends on the knowledge of health professionals, can be deployed as a method to reduce cervical cancer fatalities among women.

“KMTC releases the biggest number of medical graduates yearly. Their training is part of the long-term government strategy to make sure there is continuity and sustainability of efforts in the fight against cancer,” stated Dr Oluoch.

Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women globally, with an estimated 604 000 new cases and 342 000 deaths in 2020

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