Murang’a seeks exemption from Maraga gender directive

From left : Murang'a Women Representative Sabina Chege , Maragua MP Mary Wamaua Waithira Njoroge and Kigumo MP Ruth Mwaniki at a past event. Murang'a County has 43 per cent women representation in Parliament.

Photo credit: File | Nation Media Group

What you need to know:

  • Maragua MP Mary Wa-Maua says Murang’a County should not be affected by Chief Justice David Maraga advice to President Uhuru Kenyatta.
  • She said the county has a 43 per cent women representation in the National Assembly.
  • County cannot be punished for honouring the Constitution even before the law is formulated.
  • Murang’a has seven constituencies, three of which are represented by women namely Wa-Maua, Alice Wahome (Kandara) and Ruth Mwaniki (Kigumo). 

Murang’a County should not be affected by Chief Justice David Maraga advice to President Uhuru Kenyatta to dissolve Parliament for failing to implement the two-thirds gender rule, Maragua MP Mary Wa-Maua has said.

She said the county has a 43 per cent women representation in the National Assembly.

 “We cannot be punished for honouring the Constitution even before the law is formulated,” she said.

She was speaking at Maragua Police Station on Monday, where the Deputy Inspector General of Police Mr Edward Mbugua held a consultative meeting regarding child abuse in the region. 

Optimistic

Murang’a has seven constituencies, three of which are represented by women namely Wa-Maua, Alice Wahome (Kandara) and Ruth Mwaniki (Kigumo). 

 Ms Wahome said she is optimistic that a way out of the constitutional impasse regarding gender parity will be debated more broadly and with goodwill “as opposed to the scatter brain nature of debates so far launched.”

 She said the law, being a matter of argument, sobriety will prevail “including debating on the hindrances that curtail women competing evenly with their male counterparts hence, many failing to directly ascend to political positions through the ballot.” 

This came as Murang’a chapter of the Law Society of Kenya (LSK) remained divided on the issue, some saying Parliament as the legislating arm of government, has no escape route when faced by constitutional deadlines while others said; “authors of the Constitution assumed too much on women representation.”

No longer marginalised

Timothy Mwangi a member of LSK Murang’a chapter told Nation that “the President will now be required to offer leadership in an atmosphere of legal vacuum, especially in the event that he ignores Mr Maraga’s advice given that he again cannot appeal the verdict.”

 He said the advice is only recipe for noise to take over the debate, while the real issues in the whole affair remain unattended.

 “My personal opinion is that the whole issue of gender equality should be in policy only and not in legislation. Women are no longer marginalised as some feminists who have made a career out of this issue would want us to believe,” he said.