City evaluates flood damage

A perimeter wall to a residential house at Midland Court in South C estate was washed away by floods after a heavy downpour on November 18, 2014. Erratic weather patterns, especially in recent years, have led to unpredictable rains and flashfloods in areas that are not even known for their gutters. FILE PHOTO | JENNIFER MUIRURI | NATION MEDIA GROUP

What you need to know:

  • Nairobi has over 4,000 kilometres of roads which were turned them into rivers during the downpour. Parts of some roads were washed away, disrupting traffic.
  • Services at Kenyatta National Hospital, the biggest referral hospital in East Africa, almost came to a standstill when Kenya Power disconnected electricity, attributing the decision to the heavy downpour.

City county officials are assessing the destruction on the drainage system after massive flooding on Friday.

Nairobi has over 4,000 kilometres of roads which were turned them into rivers during the downpour. Parts of some roads were washed away, disrupting traffic. Some vehicles veered off the road while others were swept away.

The county assembly’s new Transport and Public Works executive, Mr Mohamed Abdulahi, said the drainage system needed a complete overhaul.

“Our officers are on the ground to quantify the extent of the work to be done. We know that some areas need an overhaul. In places where drainage systems are non-existent we will set them up,” he told the Nation by phone.

Informal settlements and areas around South B and South C were the worst-hit. The informal settlements usually have no drainage and sewer systems while in some places buildings are put up without the facilities.

POWER OUTAGE
A family house in Midlands Court in South C Estate was flooded when the perimeter wall collapsed. Property worth hundreds of thousands of shillings was destroyed.

The water swept away some household items.

Services at Kenyatta National Hospital, the biggest referral hospital in East Africa, almost came to a standstill when Kenya Power disconnected electricity, attributing the decision to the heavy downpour.

“In the course of the week, we will be able to know how much it costs to set up the infrastructure to withstand such heavy rainfall in future. We need to be proactive in our approach and not wait to be caught by surprise,” Mr Abdulahi said.

The executive added that there had not been any repairs since the drainage systems were set up, making it difficult to estimate the extent of the rehabilitation required.

Efforts by then Transport executive Evans Ondieki to open up drains for rain water to flow freely in August at Mukuru kwa Njenga, Embakasi South sub-county were futile.

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