A collection of news on farming, agribusiness

A woman attends to her coffee crops. Incorporating climate-smart approaches in agriculture will contribute to building women's resilience, self-reliance and economic security, according to FAO.

Photo credit: File | Nation Media Group

What you need to know:

  • Kebs managing director Bernard Njiraini said the guidelines come in the wake of the growing pressure on traditional sources of proteins, carbohydrates and fats.
  • Livestock farmers have lately turned to insects as a source of proteins for their animals.
  • FAO representative to Kenya Carla Mucavi said the organisation recognises that food security starts and ends with women, who account for 60-75 percent of the labour force on smallholder farms.

Boost to farmers as Kebs formulates standards on production of edible insects

Kenya Bureau of Standards (Kebs) has approved three guidelines that will guide production of edible insects and their processed by-products, giving the nascent sector a boost it really needed.

The Kenya Standard KS 2921:2020, according to Kebs, provides the requirements guiding farmers on the rearing of insects; including conditions that will ensure safety of the harvested produce.

It also provides the necessary minimum infrastructural and environmental requirements needed for optimal production of edible insects.

KS 2922 part one, on the other hand, provides for requirements of processed edible insects’ products packaged and presented either as whole or ground form while.

Kebs managing director Bernard Njiraini said the guidelines come in the wake of the growing pressure on traditional sources of proteins, carbohydrates and fats.  

Livestock farmers have lately turned to insects as a source of proteins for their animals.


****

Women to benefit from climate-smart practices training

The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the UN Women have signed Sh557.6 million deal targeting women in the arid and semi-arid lands of Laikipia, West Pokot and Kitui.

The four-year deal funded by the Korea International Corporation Agency (Koica), seeks to strengthen the women’s capacity to meaningfully engage in climate-smart agriculture.

FAO representative to Kenya Carla Mucavi said the organisation recognises that food security starts and ends with women, who account for 60-75 per cent of the labour force on smallholder farms.

“It is, therefore, very crucial to leave no one behind in the quest to attaining food  security,” she said. UN Women Kenya Country Representative Anna Mutavati noted that women’s economic empowerment is essential to achieving gender equality.

Welcome!

You're all set to enjoy unlimited Prime content.