Front page illustrations that made the ‘Daily Nation’ collector’s item

The Daily Nation September 12 front page, headlined “Exit Uhuru”

The Daily Nation September 12 front page, headlined “Exit Uhuru”. It’s a simple and very expressive page. Its message is enhanced by a towering image of Uhuru Kenyatta. With his back to the reader, he is seen walking away from the page.

Photo credit: Nation Media Group

What you need to know:

  • There are six issues of the Daily Nation during the month of September whose front page illustrations make them collector’s items.
  • Every one of the front pages and the relevant material on the inside pages capture the history of our country just as it was taking place, with memorable graphics combined with words.
  • Even if one was no historian, the six newspapers would be an enjoyable way of experiencing our past and future.

There are six issues of the Daily Nation during the month of September whose front page illustrations make them collector’s items.

Or at the very least make them collectable if you have a passion for newspapers that tell the history or whose design aesthetics are outstanding.

If newspapers are, indeed, “the first draft of history”, then the six distinctive issues will be interesting and significant resources in reconstructing our history.

Every one of the front pages and the relevant material on the inside pages capture the history of our country just as it was taking place, with memorable graphics combined with words.

Even if one was no historian, the six newspapers would be an enjoyable way of experiencing our past and future.

The newspaper's editions will enable future historians to see the history of this country with vivid detail and colour that are normally missing in historical accounts.

The front pages of the newspaper editions are devoted to one event and are creatively and attractively designed.

They are, indeed, historical souvenirs. In order of appearance, these are the papers of September 9 and 20, devoted to the death of Queen Elizabeth; September 12, on the exit of President Uhuru Kenyatta; September 13 and 14 (the takeover by President William Ruto; and September 28, covering President Ruto’s first Cabinet.

The front pages of the editions excel in highlighting the most critical story of the day.

Their design aesthetics optimises the effectiveness and readability of important and historic information.

Their attractive and functional layout, which combines creative use of one big picture with good use of balance, colours and text, refines and promotes the messages without cluttering the page.

An example is the September 12 front page, headlined “Exit Uhuru”. It’s a simple and very expressive page.

Its message is enhanced by a towering image of Uhuru Kenyatta. With his back to the reader, he is seen walking away from the page.

Looking majestic? Forlorn? The reader cannot tell because he is facing away. But the accompanying brief text says it. 

Its graphics, whose background colour is a shade of light green, visualise the story. There is a saying in journalism that “one picture is worth a thousand words”. In this case, it is.

The graphics make the “Exit Uhuru” story powerful and attractive. Readers can engage with the story because it is capable of triggering emotions, making the story more impactful.

Overall, the front page of the Daily Nation of September 12 perhaps gives the feeling of renewal and optimism. Like all the other five distinctive editions, the “Exit Uhuru” edition is collectable for readers who have a passion for collecting rare newspaper editions.

* * *

The full text of the Supreme Court judgment in the 2022 presidential election petition released on Monday shows how the use of the media factored in the court’s decision.

The court makes hay of the press conference by the four infamous IEBC commissioners, who, it says, surprised Kenyans with their own press conference on August 15. 

It reads in part: “Kenyans found themselves watching an appalling split-screen scenario on their television sets.

On one part of the screen was the chairperson, readying himself to declare the result... On the other part of the screen were four commissioners on the lawns of the Serena Hotel, Nairobi, from where they announced that they would not ‘own’ the result that was soon to be declared by their chairperson.”

The court also says it rejected the petitioners’ claim that 500,000 voters were not allowed to vote.

This “was merely speculative as the petitioners relied on a newspaper article which is of no evidentiary value”.

It further calls out some lawyers and parties who used social media to insult the court before the detailed judgment. 

“The use of social media to disparage the court with the intention of lowering the dignity and authority of the court or influencing the outcome of a case pending before the court trespasses the bounds of legitimate advocacy and moves to the realm of professional misconduct,” the Supreme Court said. 

The Public Editor is an independent news ombudsman who handles readers’ complaints on editorial matters including accuracy and journalistic standards. Email: [email protected] Call or text 0721989264

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