Return Kenya’s lost national pride, glory

A view of the refurbished Uhuru Park in Nairobi.

A view of the refurbished Uhuru Park in Nairobi. The renovations being carried out at Uhuru Park should carry with it a life-sized monument of those who lead in our ‘Second Liberation’ among the notables. 

Photo credit: Pool I Nation Media Group

What you need to know:

  • The new government of President Ruto should honour accordingly those who paid with their sweat and blood to bequeath us the nation we so much enjoy. 
  • While lesser mortals were found fit to be immortalised, future generations are denied a page in our history books about national heroes.
  • It is a shame that what appear as monuments of Dedan Kimathi and Tom Mboya on our streets are not their true reflections.


Kenya has had many heroes and heroines who went out of their way to make the nation what it is.

Some have been immortalised and others have been over-immortalised. Or roundly ignored. 

Some of those who had the opportunity to lead the new nation grabbed every space that there was to ‘remember’ themselves and extended the act to their spouses, children and cronies.

The new government of President William Ruto should revisit the situation. It should honour accordingly those who paid with their sweat and blood to bequeath us the nation we so much enjoy. 

It is, for instance, saddening that a person like freedom fighter Bildad Kaggia was not found fit for honour just because he went against the grain politically. 

Besides, Jaramogi Oginga Odinga’s memory was relegated to his home town of Kisumu yet the nationalist in him is unmatched by those who denied him a space of remembrance in the capital city. 

While lesser mortals were found fit to be immortalised, future generations are denied a page in our history books about national heroes.

To start with, the renovations being carried out at Uhuru Park should carry with it a life-sized monument of those who lead in our ‘Second Liberation’ among the notables. 

It is a shame that what appear as monuments of Dedan Kimathi and Tom Mboya on our streets are not their true reflections.

It is high time Kenyans learnt to embrace their history. Splashing a name on every school, college, university, hospital, road, airport or state building can't make a nobody a hero.

Chris Kiriba, Narok

* * *

I like the thoughts held by all and sundry, thoughts of hope, rehabilitation and reconstruction of the once-great ‘City in the Sun’. Yes, the City of Nairobi. 

A city crossed by rivers, the only one with a national park and once surrounded by forests. But today a pale shadow of what it was—mountains of garbage, broken sewer pipes, cries of “Mwizi! Mwizi!”, non-functional lights, and dirty old buildings are common.

It’s possible to bring back the lost glory. But wait a minute!

“Usikojoe hapa” is a great message which is easily understood and should, in fact, be respected, but again, when that call of nature comes calling, do we have any option? The city-county government can deal with this problem by providing as many clean public toilets as possible. 

We tell the mechanics not to dispose of used oil and filters yet we don’t provide them with cans in which to put them. We ask visitors not to litter the streets but we have no dustbins. It would be extremely easy to maintain cleanliness by simply introducing these all import cans.

Governor Johnson Sakaja’s government need to identify a problem and come up with the simplest way of dealing with it and Nairobi is going to be great again

Joe Mungai, Washington State, USA

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