Ensure proper delivery of subsidised fertiliser 

What you need to know:

  • Deputy President Rigathi Gachagua’s flagging off of a consignment to the counties should warm the hearts of farmers.
  • However, it is not enough to just distribute it. The authorities at the grassroots should ensure the intended recipients receive the fertiliser.
  • It should not end up in the stores of crooked brokers, who will then sell it at a higher price to the intended recipients.

The new administration of President William Ruto has made good its promise to deliver subsidised fertiliser to farmers.

Deputy President Rigathi Gachagua’s flagging off of a consignment to the counties should warm the hearts of farmers.

The vital farm input has come in time for the short rainy season.

However, it is not enough to just distribute it. The authorities at the grassroots should ensure the intended recipients receive the fertiliser.

It should not end up in the stores of crooked brokers, who will then sell it at a higher price to the intended recipients.

One of the key pledges President Ruto has made is to subsidise the price of fertiliser from Sh6,500 per 50kg bag to Sh3,500.

It’s laudable how fast this has been done, and it signals a commitment to address the high cost of living.

High food prices are a manifestation of this and one of the solutions is to increase production to meet demand.

This intervention comes at a time when some 3.5 million Kenyans are already facing starvation due to drought in the arid and semi-arid lands.

More than 10 counties, mainly in the northern region, are in urgent need of assistance. Also to benefit are the South Rift, Nairobi, eastern and coastal regions.

The relief should be felt within the next three or so months when the crops to be planted during the short rains expected from next month to December are harvested.

Some 1.4 million of the 50kg bags will be made available to farmers at the subsidised price.

To underscore the importance of this initiative, the National Treasury has provided Sh3.6 billion.

It is a timely injection that should revitalise the production of major food crops such as maize, beans, wheat and rice, which have fallen way below the national demand and consumption level.

It is also instructive that fertiliser requirements for the long rainy season next year are already being factored in. Access to quality affordable fertiliser should help to revamp agricultural production. 

Welcome!

You're all set to enjoy unlimited Prime content.