Failure to use Kiswahili in presidential debates disappointing

Agano party presidential candidate David Waihiga Mwaure

Agano Party presidential candidate David Waihiga Mwaure speaks during a presidential debate at the Catholic University of Eastern Africa on July 26, 2022.

Photo credit: Sila Kiplagat | Nation Media Group

Debates • Quite disappointing for Nicholas Murithi on the presidential and running mate debates was the failure to use the national language, Kiswahili. “I would have loved to see Martha Karua (Azimio), and Rigathi Gachagua (UDA) and DP William Ruto tackle issues in Kiswahili with Swaleh Mdoe, Zubeda Koome, or Mary Kilobi Atwoli. What a big miss by the organisers!” His contact is nicholas.[email protected].

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Fuel • While the government released a massive Sh61 billion fuel subsidy, Joseph Macharia is surprised that a similar thing can’t be done to reduce the skyrocketing food prices as well. “How about a subsidy for maize millers to enable them to import grains and sell unga at an affordable price? I believe the food crisis is far more devastating than the fuel cost.” His contact is [email protected].

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Sewage • For five years, Mathangani Muya laments, sewage has been freely flowing from a trench near the Junction Mall, where Kingara Road joins Ngong Road into Kirichwa Kubwa River in Nairobi. This, he adds, is not just unlawful, but also an environmental hazard. He would like the NMS and Nema to establish the source of the muck and punish the culprits. His contact is [email protected]

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Electricity • A resident of Mazeras in Kilifi County, Gideon Bebora, applied for electricity connection to his home in June 2021, and promptly paid the requisite charges. However, over a year down the line, power has not been connected. “Can someone at Kenya Power, please, explain what is going on and why this can’t be finalised?” The reference number is E2219202180065, and his contact, [email protected].

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Bhang • Though he doesn’t say so, Njora Waweru seems to have been driven down memory lane by George Wajackoyah’s bhang talk. Says he: “My late father belonged to the ‘Kimunya bangi rika (age group)’, literally meaning those that uprooted bhang. They came of age in the early 1940s. I never asked him about the name's origin. Can historians throw light on this?” His contact is [email protected].

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