Campaign posters eyesore should be curbed

Campaign posters

Campaign posters stuck on a traffic control unit along Argwings Kodhek Road on April 16, 2022. As the election campaigns gain momentum, many open spaces are being taken over by campaign posters and billboards. 

Photo credit: Francis Nderitu | Nation Media Group

What you need to know:

  • Recent Supreme Court rulings have confirmed the need for fidelity to the Constitution.
  • Fuel crisis has confirmed that Kenya is the strangest country in East and Central Africa.

Poster peril • Every election season comes with a poster menace and Ruth Gituma is now rooting for a specific law to prohibit this. The Kenya National Highways Authority (KeNHA), she points out, “has been able to deter the pasting of posters on highway infrastructure by imposing heavy fines”. She wants this done to prevent politicians’ agents from defacing lampposts and walls. Her contact is [email protected].

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Rule of law • Recent Supreme Court rulings have confirmed the need for fidelity to the Constitution, says Fred Njuki. One is the rejection of the creation of 70 constituencies for lack of public participation. The other key verdict is that the President can’t institute a popular amendment of the Constitution, and the confirmation that a sitting Head of State can’t be sued. His contact is [email protected].

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Strange country • The fuel crisis has confirmed that Kenya is the strangest country in East and Central Africa, says Peter John. “The government has released fuel subsidies to oil marketers but the fuel shortage is still biting. Some motorists even fuel their vehicles in neighbouring countries, whose supply is imported through Mombasa Port. This is really funny.” His contact is [email protected].

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Skin problem • What became of the once-thriving leather industry, asks John Nyagah. Growing up in Gatanga, Murang’a County, in the 1980s, he recalls, his father used to buy goat and sheep skins in the villages and dry and sell them in Thika Town. “Today, there is no market and we just give the skins to dogs. What happened, as we all still wear shoes and belts?” His contact is [email protected].

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Lineage • During the memorial service of a politician in Musanda, South Mumias, Kakamega Country, Jim Webo says he noted some peculiar excitement as elderly men introduced themselves by narrating their lineage. “Some effortlessly rolled off the names of their ancestors up to the seventh generation. Rounds of cheers confirmed a people proud of their ancestry in the old Wanga Kingdom.” 

Have a cultural day, won’t you!

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