Limit number of children a family can bear

Census

Jeremy Kwendo (left) a Kenya Nation Bureau of Statistics ICT Supervisor, and Maureen Marango second (right), a supervisor, assist census enumerators at Tuuti Sub-location in Kanduyi, Bungoma County in transferring data during the 2019 Population and Housing Census on August 28, 2019. 

Photo credit: Jared Nyataya | Nation Media Group

What you need to know:

  • The consequences of unlimited childbirth are glaring at the economically crippled nation with looming overpopulation. 
  • A limit of, say, two children per women would help in population control while also allowing room for 36.1 per cent Kenyans to escape living below the poverty line.

The last national census, of 2019, put Kenya’s population at 47.5 million. This was a significant increase over 30 years, by an annual factor of 2.5, from 15.3 million in 1979. These statistics put the average population growth rate at over three per cent.

This comes as no surprise. Our cities are literally bursting with people despite the nosediving standards of living that seem to engulf about 98 per cent amid a poverty rate of 86.50 per cent. 

The consequences of unlimited childbirth are glaring at the economically crippled nation with looming overpopulation. This is expected, factoring in the link between poverty and sexual activity.

With the current rate of 3.56 births per woman, factored in by a high fertility rate among Kenyan women and the expected increase in life expectancy from 54 to 68 by 2050, the population is set to continue increasing dangerously amid debt and economic stagnation.

Limited childbirth

A limit of, say, two children per women would help in population control while also allowing room for the 17.4 million (36.1 per cent) Kenyans to escape living below the poverty line. It would help us to resolve most challenges, such as unemployment owing to reduction of competition in the job market and businesses; and homelessness would be easier to deal with.

In 2019, Kenya’s hunger situation was ranked on the global index as serious. This disaster has greatly affected the country for years. With less people, it would be easier for the government to manage hunger and other disasters. Crime would go down because of job opportunities.

Families would easily provide for their children. With life more bearable, drug abuse would reduce. So would corruption, given that not many would have to bribe for a job or service.

Limited childbirth would also create time for parents to further develop themselves outside their families. Basically, the lives of most Kenyans would definitely be easier.

Ms Otieno is a Third Year biochemistry student at Moi University. ateryot@gmail.com

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